Ilia Chavchavadze was born in Qvareli, a village in Kvareli,[7] located in the Alazani Valley,

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Ilia Chavchavadze was born in Qvareli, a village in Kvareli,[7] located in the Alazani Valley,

2019-06-12 23:00:002019-06-12 23:00:00

Ilia Chavchavadze was born in Qvareli, a village in Kvareli,[7] located in the Alazani Valley,

Prince Ilia Chavchavadze (Georgian: ილია ჭავჭავაძე; 8 November 1837 — 12 September 1907) was a Georgian writer, political figure, poet, and publisher who spearheaded the revival of the Georgian national movement in the second half of the 19th century, during the Russian rule of Georgia. He is Georgia's "most universally revered hero."[1] Inspired by the contemporary liberal movements in Europe, as a writer and a public figure, Chavchavadze directed much of his efforts toward awakening national ideals in Georgians and to the creation of a stable society in his homeland. His most important literary works were: The Hermit, The Ghost, Otaraant Widow, Kako The Robber, Happy Nation, Letters of a Traveler and Is a man a human?!. He was editor-in-chief of the periodicals Sakartvelos Moambe (1863–77) and Iveria (1877–1905), and authored numerous articles for journals. He was a devoted protector of the Georgian language and culture from Russification. He is considered the main contributor of Georgian cultural nationalism.[2][3] The three main ethnic markers of Georgian identity, according to Chavchavadze, consisted of territory, language, and Christianity.[4] Despite this, his nationalism was secular.[5] Chavchavadze was fatally wounded in Tsitsamuri, outside Mtskheta, by a gang of assassins. His legacy earned him the broad admiration of the Georgian people. In 1987 he was canonized as Saint Ilia the Righteous (წმინდა ილია მართალი, tsminda ilia martali) by the Georgian Orthodox Church. Today, Georgians revere Chavchavadze as The Uncrowned King (უგვირგვინო მეფე, ugvirgvino mepe) and the "Father of the Nation."[6]